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‘Prince of Pot’ prepares for prison


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#1 medpot

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 06:06 AM

Metro News Vancouver

Contact Us


‘Prince of Pot’ prepares for prison

Emery tying up loose ends before beginning up to 15 years in U.S. jail


KRISTEN THOMPSON
METRO VANCOUVER
September 21, 2009 5:36 a.m.


Posted Image
Kristen Thompson / Metro Vancouver
Marc Emery hugs his wife, Jodie, in their downtown
Vancouver apartment yesterday.



Marc Emery says he’s spending his last few days of freedom tying up loose ends with his business before being sent south of the border to begin serving a drugs-related sentence.

“You typically miss fresh air and good food, two things that are not available inside federal prisons,” said Emery.

This will be his second time behind bars after spending three months in a Saskatoon jail in 2004.

On Sept. 28, Vancouver’s Prince of Pot will be shipped to the United States and imprisoned for anywhere from a year to 15 years for selling marijuana seeds online.

He said around 120 parties and rallies were held in major cities around the world, including New York City, Washington, D.C., and Dublin Saturday to protest his impending incarceration.

The event outside the Vancouver Art Gallery drew around 400 people.

“Jodie is alternately crushed and … (moved) by the tributes,” Emery said of his wife, who added that the hardest part for her will be waking up alone.

“But I’ll be working, keeping busy (working at Emery’s Cannabis Culture Headquarters),” said Jodie.

“That’s the key to not going nuts,” said Marc. “Otherwise you just spend the whole time sentimentalizing.”

Emery said he plans to learn French and Spanish in jail, and write his memoir.

“I’ve got a lot of amusing stories to tell,” he said.




#2 Miranda

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 07:28 AM

No matter what anyone's personal opinion is of Marc there's a real injustice being played out when he's to be sentenced to a a US prison for a crime that a) isn't one that warrants jail time in Canada (fine & possible probation) and b) was condoned by both federal & provincial governments when they accepted his tax dollars.

#3 Kegan

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 09:33 AM

sadly, i expect he will not live to see 2010..... some asshole guard, inmate, warden, DA, or politician, will take it upon themselves to...... well, i think he would have a better chance living in the woods of BC than in any US jail..... i hope he is okay, but i don;t think he will be.

#4 papapuff

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 02:14 PM

News1130



Marc Emery prepares for U.S. jail term


'Prince of Pot' turns himself in Monday


Dave White VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) 2009-09-27 11:30

Posted Image
Marc Emery faces a five year prison sentence in the U.S. (News1130 file photo)


VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) - The 'Prince of Pot' will surrender to American authorities at 9 o'clock tomorrow morning.

Marc Emery faces a five year prison sentence in the United States for selling marijuana seeds over the internet.

He says he's not worried about doing time, and has a number of plans to keep occupied. His wife Jodie will continue to run his business.

Yesterday rallies in more than 100 cities around the world spoke out against his imprisonment. Several hundred people rallied in Vancouver last weekend in a vain attempt to keep Emery in Canada.


#5 Jim.T

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 04:18 PM

No matter what anyone's personal opinion is of Marc there's a real injustice being played out when he's to be sentenced to a a US prison for a crime that a) isn't one that warrants jail time in Canada (fine & possible probation) and b) was condoned by both federal & provincial governments when they accepted his tax dollars.


I agree with you Miranda this is an injustice to all Canadians and with our Government collecting those tax dollars that just compounds the injustice.

Jim.T

#6 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 05:35 AM

Metro News Vancouver

Letters to the Editor


Prince of Pot to be held in police custody



METRO VANCOUVER
September 28, 2009 5:07 a.m.


Prince of Pot Marc Emery will be taken into police custody today as part of the plea deal that will see him extradited to the United States.

Emery, 51, the leader of the B.C. Marijuana Party, will appear in B.C. Supreme Court this morning.

He will then be held in custody until an order is given for his extradition, and he is expected to plead guilty in a Seattle Court to one count of conspiracy to manufacture marijuana.

Emery, the editor and publisher of Cannabis Culture Magazine, was arrested in 2005 at the request of U.S. officials for his mail-order pot-seed business.




#7 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 07:08 AM

Cornwall Free News


Canadian to be Extradited to US over Pot Seed Sales – Marc Emery



Posted Image


What interesting times we live in here in Canada. California calls for legalization and TAXATION of Marijuana. We now have medical Marijuana use in North America. It’s completely accepted in most of Europe. It’s like jaywalking in the sense that it’s a crime, but how many jaywalkers do you see get ticketed?

Jodie Emery is blogging about her and Marc’s experience. Fundamentally this is about politics as monies from Marc’s business gets channeled to groups lobbying for the legalization of Marijuana in the US and Canada. He filed his income taxes and has paid over $500K to Federal and Provincial governments and clearly showed his income as the sale of Marijuana seeds. His crime has been for mailing seeds to the US.

What an odd world we live in when someone gets more time in jail for mailing marijuana seeds than Drunk Driving, robbery, or even murder in some instances. Why is Mr Harper’s government extraditing this man?

“He will remain in jail here in BC until the federal Justice Minister, Robert Nicholson, signs the extradition order to turn Marc over to US custody. That can happen a week after September 28th or up to 60 days later. (We still urge people to call the Justice Minister and tell him to NOT extradite Marc Emery — go to www.NoExtradition.net for the contact information.)

The goal is to bring Marc Emery back to Canada as soon as possible so he can be released on day parole as a “first-time, non-violent offender”. It’s absolutely necessary to keep his story alive and in the headlines, to remind people that this is as an affront to Canadian sovereignty.”

There’s so much in this case. If you’re interested you can read more on their WEBSITE.

With the recession going on perhaps it’s time to review our attitude towards Marijuana. Do you know how much we could collect in taxes in this country and province if we legalized the sale of Marijuana? Enough to not need the HST. And saving the law enforcement costs would be a mountain of money too.




#8 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 07:09 AM

Cornwall Free Press

1. Russell Barth Says:

September 28th, 2009 at 4:40 am

I will be surprised if Emery lives to see 2010. His charisma will likely make him as many enemies as friends, and sadly, we are basically allowing this man to go to another country to die because the US tells us to. We are no longer sovereign. We are the US’s slave.



#9 S^N

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 07:53 AM

The Vancouver Sun


Prince of Pot's sentence reeks of injustice and mocks our sovereignty

Emery's jail term longer than for some violent crimes


By Ian Mulgrew, Vancouver Sun September 28, 2009 2:11 AM


Posted Image
Marijuana activist Marc Emery wrapped up
a 30-city 'farewell tour' before turning himself
in to serve a five-year sentence in the U.S.

Photograph by: Ward Perrin, Vancouver Sun files, Vancouver Sun



After two decades as Canada's Prince of Pot, Marc Emery will surrender himself today in B.C. Supreme Court and become the country's first Marijuana Martyr.

Emery will begin serving what could be as long as five years behind bars as Uncle Sam's prisoner for a crime that in Canada would have earned him at most a month in the local hoosegow.

It is a legal tragedy that in my opinion marks the capitulation of our sovereignty and underscores the hypocrisy around cannabis.

Emery hasn't even visited America but he was arrested in July 2005 at the request of a Republican administration that abhorred his politics.

He is being handed over to a foreign government for an activity we are loath to prosecute because we don't think selling seeds is a major problem.

There are at least a score of seed-sellers downtown and many, many more such retail outlets across the country.

In the days ahead, once the federal justice minister signs the extradition papers, Emery will be frog-marched south to Seattle where his plea bargain will be rubber-stamped and he will be sent to a U.S. penitentiary.

For comparison, consider that the B.C. Court of Appeal last year said a one-month jail sentence plus probation was appropriate punishment for drug and money-laundering offences of this ilk.

The last time Emery was convicted in Canada of selling pot seeds, back in 1998, he was given a $2,000 fine.

In July, his co-accused Michelle Rainey and Greg Williams were given two years probation for conspiracy to manufacture marijuana.

They were indicted along with Emery for their role in what the authorities described as a $3-million-a-year business.

Rainey, 38, worked for Emery from 1998 to 2005, helping him operate the B.C. Marijuana Party and his mail-order business.

The 54-year-old Williams took phone orders.

Emery flouted the law for more than a decade and every year he sent his seed catalogue to politicians of every stripe. He ran in federal, provincial and civic elections promoting his pro-cannabis platform.

He championed legal marijuana at parliamentary hearings, on national television, at celebrity conferences, in his own magazine, Cannabis Culture, and on his own Internet channel, Pot TV.

Health Canada even recommended medical marijuana patients buy their seeds from his company.

From 1998 until his arrest, Emery even paid provincial and federal taxes as a "marijuana seed vendor" totalling nearly $600,000.

He was targeted because of his success, targeted as surely as pot comic Tommy Chong -- who spent nearly a year in U.S. jail because his son ran a company selling glass pipes.

Emery challenged a law he disagrees with using exactly the non-violent, democratic processes we urge our children to embrace and of which we are so proud.

"The same seeds I sold are being sold right in America," Emery complained. "The people in California are doing it the same way I did so there's a terrible hypocrisy at work here."

He's right.

Emery recently wrapped up a 30-city "farewell tour" of speaking engagements across Canada.

And, he's banking on the transfer agreement that allows Canadians convicted and jailed in America to serve their time here and take advantage of our very liberal early-release laws.

If that happened, he could be out within a few years. But Ottawa has regularly rejected drug offenders for the program and I doubt Emery will find any sympathy.

I suspect he's likely to moulder in a violent, overcrowded U.S. jail for probably his full five-year sentence.

"I'm going to do more time than many violent, repeat offenders," he noted.

"There isn't a single victim in my case, no one who can stand up and say, 'I was hurt by Marc Emery.' No one."

He's right again.

Emery is facing more jail time than corporate criminals who defraud widows and orphans and longer incarceration than violent offenders who leave their victims dead or in wheelchairs.

Whatever else you may think of him -- and I know he rankles many -- what is happening to him today mocks our independence and our ideal of justice.


imulgrew@vancouversun.com



© Copyright © The Vancouver Sun


#10 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 08:24 AM

CBC News British Columbia

SEND YOUR FEEDBACK


Marijuana activist Marc Emery to surrender



Last Updated: Monday, September 28, 2009 | 5:32 AM PT
CBC News


Marc Emery, Canada's self-proclaimed "Prince of Pot," appears Monday in B.C. Supreme Court, where he is to be taken into police custody to await extradition to the United States.

Posted Image
Michelle Rainey, vice-president of the B.C.
Marijuana Party, hugs Marc Emery in
Vancouver on Aug. 5, 2005, after supporters
paid $50,000 to bail him out of jail. He was
released after his arrest on U.S.-based drug
charges.

(Sam Leung/Canadian Press)

He was arrested in 2005 at the request of U.S. officials for selling marijuana seeds over the internet from Vancouver.

The leader of B.C.'s Marijuana Party, who runs a magazine called Cannabis Culture, faces a five-year prison term as part of a plea deal.

Once extradited, Emery, 51, is expected to plead guilty in a Seattle court to conspiracy to manufacture marijuana.

He says accepting jail time allowed his two co-conspirators — Michelle Rainey and Greg Williams — to each be given two years' probation. Had he gambled on a trial, he would be looking at up to 50 years behind bars, he says.

Emery's business made millions of dollars over the years, but he says he gave it all away to marijuana advocacy groups around the world.

His wife, Jodie, is trying not to think about what awaits her husband.

"It'll be very lonely, but that'll just encourage me to get him back in my arms as soon as possible," she told CBC News.

Her plan is to lobby the federal government for Emery's swift transfer to a Canadian prison.




#11 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 09:45 AM

National Post


Canada’s 'Prince of Pot' to surrender for U.S. extradition



Canwest News Service
Published: Monday, September 28, 2009


Posted Image
Ward PerrinCanwest News Service
Marc Emery was indicted in 2005 along with two associates
on drug and money-laundering charges stemming from a
lucrative mail-order pot-seed business run out of Mr.
Emery’s Vancouver book and ...



VANCOUVER -- Canada's "Prince of Pot," Marc Emery, is expected to surrender to authorities Monday and await extradition to the U.S. where he is expected to serve up to five years in prison for shipping marijuana seeds across the border.

Mr. Emery, 51 was indicted in 2005 along with two associates on drug and money-laundering charges stemming from a lucrative mail-order pot-seed business run out of Mr. Emery's Vancouver book and paraphernalia shop, which also doubled as B.C.'s Marijuana Party headquarters.

Two charges Mr. Emery faced -- conspiracy to distribute marijuana and conspiracy to engage in money laundering -- were dropped in exchange for his guilty plea on the charge of conspiracy to manufacture marijuana.

Canadian authorities drew criticism for helping the U.S. nab Mr. Emery because he openly participated in an operation that drew little heat in Canada.

Mr. Emery is expected to surrender to authorities before the B.C. Supreme Court, beginning a process that is expected to take him into a U.S. prison to serve time for a crime that would have netted him a fraction of the punishment in Canada.

Mr. Emery was convicted in Canada of selling pot seeds in 1998 and given a $2,000 fine.

Mr. Emery's two associates, Michelle Rainey, 38, and Gregory Williams, 54, were recently sentenced in the U.S. to two years probation for conspiracy to manufacture marijuana as a result of a plea deal.

Mr. Emery, now dubbed the country's first "marijuana martyr," recently wrapped up a 30-city "farewell tour" across Canada.

He is also hoping a transfer agreement allowing Canadians convicted and jailed in the U.S. to serve their time back home will play in his favour.

"The same seeds I sold are being sold right in America... There's a terrible hypocrisy at work here," said Mr. Emery. "There isn't a single victim in my case, no one who can stand up and say, ‘I was hurt by Marc Emery.' No one."

- with files from the Vancouver Sun



#12 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 09:48 AM

Georgia Straight


September 28, 2009

Marc Emery will surrender today and go to jail for selling marijuana seeds


By Charlie Smith


Vancouver marijuana activist Marc Emery is expected to turn himself into authorities today (September 28) as part of a deal that will see him serve up to five years in a U.S. jail for selling cannabis seeds.

Emery's wife Jodie wrote on the Cannabis Culture magazine Web site that he will turn himself in at 10 a.m. at B.C. Supreme Court.

Justice Minister Rob Nicholson will likely sign an extradition order, which means Emery will serve his time south of the border among violent criminals.

I called the U.S. consulate in Vancouver recently asking for information about what steps would have to be taken so that Emery could serve his time in Canada. I never received a call back.




#13 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 09:55 AM

News1130.com


Marc Emery turns himself in for extradition hearing this morning

Could spend five years in U.S. jail


Mike Lloyd VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) | Monday, September 28th, 2009 7:12 am


Posted Image
Marc Emery (News1130)


VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) - Marijuana activist Marc Emery is expected to turn himself over to the Americans this morning at B.C. Supreme Court, and the self-proclaimed 'Prince of Pot' says he's prepared to spend the next five years in a U.S. prison.

The longtime marijuana activist's extradition hearing is at 10 o'clock this morning. The U.S. government first asked for it back in 2005, targeting Emery for his mail-order pot seed business, something that would probably get him a month behind bars in Canada, if anything.

On the streets of Vancouver, most local people we spoke with say the U.S. jail time is too much given the crime, and some say there are sovereignty issues too. "What does it take to get taken out of Canada and put in jail in the States? Really, can that happen for doing something as simple as selling the seeds of a plant that grows naturally?"

Emery will say a few words before his hearing. There were rallies in 100 cities around the world over the weekend in support of his cause.




#14 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 11:48 AM

CTV British Columbia


B.C.'s 'Prince of Pot' faces extradition hearing Monday


Updated: Mon Sep. 28 2009 09:11:29

ctvbc.ca


Posted Image
Cannabis crusader Marc Emery, of Vancouver, smokes
marijuana as he holds a plant at a gathering of
pro-marijuana legalization supporters outside police
headquarters in Toronto Thursday, June 19 , 2003.

(CP PHOTO / Kevin Frayer)


On Monday morning, marijuana activist Marc Emery is set to hold what could be his last news conference in B.C. for several years.

Emery will address reporters on the steps of the B.C. Supreme courthouse in Vancouver at 9 a.m. Monday morning, shortly before heading inside to surrender to authorities.

Emery is facing extradition to the United States where he faces a five year sentence for selling pot seeds to customers south of the border.

Posted Image
Marc Emery (in striped shirt) being greeted at Calgary
International Airport.


"I'm being taken to a U.S. prison for something I did in Canada as innocuous as selling seeds which don't even have any drug quality. And yet, I have to face a five-year term for that," Emery told CTV News during a farewell tour in July.
Emery's wife Jodie expressed her grief in an interview with ctvbc.ca Monday morning.

"I'm absolutely devastated and distraught that my husband is being taken away from me," she said.

"It's a betrayal of our sovereignty and citizenship."

Jodie Emery blames the federal Conservative government for allowing her husband's extradition, but hopes that public outcry could still halt the process.

"The Conservative government is outsourcing our justice system," she said. "If there's enough public pressure, perhaps Marc could still be sentenced here instead."

The so-called Prince of Pot says a plea agreement with U.S. prosecutors means he should be able to spend much of his sentence in Canada and be paroled within a few years.

With files from The Canadian Press




#15 papapuff

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 01:24 PM

The Canadian Press

September 28, 2009


B.C.'s Prince of Pot surrenders for extradition to U.S. to face drug charges


(CP) – 1 hour ago

Posted Image
Marc Emery smokes marijuana
as he holds a plant at a
gathering of pro-marijuana
legalization supporters in
Toronto on June 19, 2003.
Emery says he's surrendering
himself today to face extradition
to the U.S., where he faces drug
charges related to his mail order
marijuana seed business. (THE
CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin
Frayer)


VANCOUVER, B.C. — B.C.'s "prince of pot" is heading to a U.S. prison.

Pot activist Marc Emery says he's surrendering himself today to face extradition to the U.S., where he faces drug charges related to his mail order marijuana seed business. Emery reached a plea agreement with U.S. prosecutors.

Speaking just outside B.C. Supreme Court, Emery encouraged his supporters to continue fighting the "evil prohibition" of marijuana.

He said he'll be jailed in the U.S. with hardened criminals from drug cartels and gangs, but he hopes to take advantage of an agreement between Canada and the U.S. that allows prisoners to be transferred to their home countries.

Emery said he hopes to be back on the streets of B.C. a year from how if he's allowed to serve his time in a Canadian prison.


#16 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 01:33 PM

Kelowna.com


Pot activist Marc Emery taken into custody for extradition to the U.S.


Monday, September 28th, 2009 | 11:11 am


Posted Image


By John McDonald


Famed marijuana activist Marc Emery surrendered himself this morning to Canadian justice officials, the first step in his extradition to the United States for selling marijuana seeds over the Internet.

The flamboyant Emery, known as the Prince of Pot, was sent off in an emotional farewell by dozens of supports, in a throng of media.

His wife Jodie tearfully begged Canadians to remember her husband and support efforts to have him transfered to the Canadian prison system as soon as possible.

Emery will be processed in Canada before being sent to the U.S. to begin serving a five-year sentence.

The controversial extradition is the result of his arrest in 2005 by Canadian police at the request of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency.

They accused Emergy of selling millions of dollars of marijuana seeds through is mail order Internet website.

Emery is the head of the B.C. Marijuana Party and publisher of the online Cannabis Culture magazine.

john@kelowna.com

250-575-0521

Posted Image

Posted Image


#17 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 01:38 PM

The Vancouver Sun


Marc Emery in jail awaiting extradition to U.S.



By Ian Mulgrew, Vancouver SunS eptember 28, 2009 11:19 AM


Posted Image
Mark Emery and wife Jodie Emery at an emotional farewell to
the Prince of Pot, Marc Emery, who was outside the Law Courts
today to turn himself in for transfer to the U.S. where he was
convicted of selling marijuana seeds to Americans. He turned
himself in on September 28, 2009 in Vancouver.

Photograph by: Ian Smith, Vancouver Sun


VANCOUVER - Marc Emery was escorted out of B.C. Supreme Court and into jail Monday to await extradition to the U.S.

His wife wailed and wept in the public gallery while a motley crowd of the cannabis crusader who choked the tiny courtroom chanted: "Free Marc Emery!"

As he was led away Emery yelled: "I love you Jody Emery. Plant the seeds of freedom - over grow the government."

He will be held for 30 days to give him time to appeal and then, once the federal justice minister has signed the removal order, Emery will be handed over to the U.S.

He has agreed to a five-year imprisonment plea-bargain for drug and money laundering charges laid in 2005 in connection with his $3-million a year marijuana seed catalogue business, most of whose customers were American.

© Copyright © The Vancouver Sun



#18 papapuff

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 02:01 PM

Vancouver Sun



Marc Emery in jail awaiting extradition to U.S.



By Ian Mulgrew, Vancouver Sun
September 28, 2009 11:52 AM


Posted Image
Mark Emery and wife Jodie Emery at an emotional farewell to the Prince of Pot, Marc Emery,
who was outside the Law Courts today to turn himself in for transfer to the U.S. where he
was convicted of selling marijuana seeds to Americans. He turned himself in on September 28,
2009 in Vancouver.
Photograph by: Ian Smith, Vancouver Sun


VANCOUVER — Canada's self-proclaimed "Prince of Pot" was escorted out of B.C. Supreme Court and into jail Monday to await extradition to the U.S., where he is to serve up to five years in prison for shipping marijuana seeds across the border.

Marc Emery, 51, was indicted in 2005 along with two associates on drug and money-laundering charges stemming from a lucrative mail-order pot-seed business run out of Emery's Vancouver book and paraphernalia shop, which also doubled as B.C.'s Marijuana Party headquarters.

Two charges Emery faced — conspiracy to distribute marijuana and conspiracy to engage in money laundering — were dropped in exchange for his guilty plea on the charge of conspiracy to manufacture marijuana.

He has agreed to a five-year imprisonment plea bargain in connection with his $3-million a year marijuana seed catalogue business, where most of his customers were American.

Canadian authorities drew criticism for helping the U.S. nab Emery because he openly participated in an operation that drew little heat in Canada.

Emery was convicted in Canada of selling pot seeds in 1998 and given a $2,000 fine.

Emery's two associates, Michelle Rainey, 38, and Gregory Williams, 54, were recently sentenced in the U.S. to two years probation for conspiracy to manufacture marijuana as a result of a plea deal.

As Emery left the tiny courtroom, his wife Jody wept in the public gallery while a crowd of the cannabis crusader's followers chanted: "Free Marc Emery!"

As he was led away, he yelled: "I love you Jody Emery. Plant the seeds of freedom; overgrow the government!"

Emery will be held for 30 days to give him time to appeal and then, once the federal justice minister has signed the removal order, Emery will be handed over to the U.S.

Now dubbed the country's first "marijuana martyr," Emery recently wrapped up a 30-city "farewell tour" across Canada.

He is also hoping a transfer agreement allowing Canadians convicted and jailed in the U.S. to serve their time back home will play in his favour.

"The same seeds I sold are being sold right in America . . . There's a terrible hypocrisy at work here," said Emery. "There isn't a single victim in my case, no one who can stand up and say, 'I was hurt by Marc Emery.' No one."


With files from the Vancouver Sun


#19 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:28 PM

The Calgary Herald


Gallery: Marc Emery's tearful goodbye

Canada's self-proclaimed "Prince of Pot" was escorted out of B.C. Supreme Court and into jail Monday to await extradition to the U.S., where he is to serve up to five years in prison for shipping marijuana seeds across the border. Marc Emery, 51, was indicted in 2005 along with two associates on drug and money-laundering charges stemming from a lucrative mail-order pot-seed business run out of Emery's Vancouver book and paraphernalia shop, which also doubled as B.C.'s Marijuana Party headquarters. As Emery left the tiny courtroom, his wife Jody wept in the public gallery while a crowd of the cannabis crusader's followers chanted: "Free Marc Emery!"

September 28, 2009 3:41 PM

Posted Image
Marc Emery comforts wife Jody during an emotional farewell
outside the Law Courts on Monday. Canada's self-proclaimed
"Prince of Pot" was escorted out of B.C. Supreme Court and
into jail Monday to await extradition to the U.S., where he is
to serve up to five years in prison for shipping marijuana
seeds across the border.

Photograph by: Ian Smith, Vancouver Sun

Posted Image
A tearful goodbye to Marc Emery.
Photograph by: Ian Smith, Vancouver Sun

Posted Image
Marc Emery, Canada's self-proclaimed "Prince of Pot," was
escorted out of B.C. Supreme Court and into jail Monday
to await extradition to the U.S., where he is to serve up to
five years in prison for shipping marijuana seeds across
the border.

Photograph by: Ian Smith, Vancouver Sun

Posted Image
An emotional farewell to the Prince of Pot, Marc Emery. As he
was led away, he yelled: "I love you Jody Emery. Plant the
seeds of freedom; overgrow the government!"

Photograph by: Ian Smith, Vancouver Sun

Posted Image
Marc Emery speaks to supporters outside the courthouse.
Emery will be held for 30 days to give him time to appeal
and then, once the federal justice minister has signed the
removal order, Emery will be handed over to the U.S.

Photograph by: Ian Smith, Vancouver Sun

Posted Image
Marc Emery and wife Jody Emery at an emotional farewell to
the Prince of Pot on Monday in Vancouver.

Photograph by: Ian Smith, Vancouver Sun

Posted Image
Mark Emery and a teary-eyed wife Jody Emery head for the
door after an emotional farewell Monday.

Photograph by: Ian Smith, Vancouver Sun



#20 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:33 PM

REUTERS


Canada's "Prince of Pot" starts extradition to U.S


Mon Sep 28, 2009 5:14pm EDT


http://ca.reuters.co...-MARIJUANA.jpeg


VANCOUVER, British Columbia (Reuters) - Canada's self-proclaimed "Prince of Pot" gave himself up for extradition to the United States on Monday where he is expected to be jailed for up to five years for selling marijuana seeds to U.S. buyers.

Marc Emery, 51, was arrested in 2005 at the request of U.S. officials on allegations of selling millions of dollars in seeds, mostly by mail-order, from the business he operated openly in Canada for years.

A U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency statement in 2005 hailed Emery's arrest as blow to the "marijuana legalization movement" and cited his financial support of pro-pot groups in Canada and the United States.

Emery, the founder of the British Columbia Marijuana Party and the self-proclaimed "Prince of Pot," was convicted in Canada in 1998 for selling pot seeds and given a C$2,000 ($1,835) fine.

He initially fought his extradition to the United States but later, faced with a possible life sentence, decided to plead guilty to lesser charges. He recently finished a 30-city "farewell tour" across Canada.

($1 = $1.08 Canadian)

(Reporting by Nicole Mordant; Editing by Frank McGurty)


#21 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 06:38 PM

CBC News

SEND YOUR FEEDBACK


Marijuana activist Emery awaits extradition


Last Updated: Monday, September 28, 2009 | 2:46 PM PT
CBC News


Posted Image
Marc Emery talks to reporters outside the B.C.
Supreme Court in Vancouver Monday morning
before turning himself in for extradition to the
U.S.
(CBC)


Marc Emery, Canada's self-proclaimed "Prince of Pot," was taken into custody in a Vancouver courtroom Monday morning to await extradition to the United States.

Before entering the B.C. Supreme Court, Emery spoke to a crowd of reporters and supporters outside, telling them he still believes Canada's drug laws prohibiting the use of marijuana are unjust and blaming the laws and the politicians who support them for creating the large criminal organizations that control the illegal trade in marijuana.

"There is no crime here. The politicians who support this extradition are supporters of organized crime. We are making criminals with laws like this," said Emery.

After his surrender, Emery was expected to be sent to North Fraser Pretrial Centre in Port Coquitlam, east of Vancouver, to await extradition to the U.S., a process the judge suggested will likely take a month to complete.

Once extradited, Emery, 51, is expected to plead guilty in a Seattle court to conspiracy to manufacture marijuana. The leader of B.C.'s Marijuana Party, who runs a magazine called Cannabis Culture, faces a five-year prison term as part of a plea deal.

Emery was arrested in 2005 — following an investigation by Canadian and U.S. police — for allegedly selling marijuana seeds over the internet from Vancouver to residents of the U.S.

He said accepting jail time allowed his two co-accused — Michelle Rainey and Greg Williams — to each be given two years' probation. Had he gambled on a trial, he could have faced up to 50 years behind bars, he said.

Ready for jail term

Emery said his biggest concern about serving time in a U.S. prison is the boredom he will face.

"Boredom is the primary problem in jail, so I'm hoping to keep busy with books and writing, and learning languages — French and Spanish," he told CBC News.

His wife, Jodie Emery, is trying not to think about what awaits her husband.

"It'll be very lonely, but that'll just encourage me to get him back in my arms as soon as possible," she told CBC News. Her plan is to lobby the federal government for Emery's swift transfer to a Canadian prison.

Emery has said his business made millions of dollars over the years selling marijuana seeds by mail order and running a hemp product store in downtown Vancouver. He said he used the money to run his many political campaigns and to support marijuana advocacy groups around the world.




#22 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 07:03 PM

The Globe and Mail


'Prince of pot' facing extradition

Marc Emery – who will serve a five-year prison term in the U.S. for selling
marijuana seeds – turned himself in to authorities in Vancouver



Terri Theodore

Vancouver — The Canadian Press
Last updated on Monday, Sep. 28, 2009 07:23PM EDT


After flouting marijuana laws for decades, British Columbia's so-called prince of pot turned himself in to authorities Monday to face extradition to the United States.

But Marc Emery was defiant until the end.

“Plant the seeds of freedom. Overgrow the government everyone,” Mr. Emery yelled as he was led away by sheriffs at the B.C. Supreme Court in downtown Vancouver.

His wife, Jodie Emery, wept during the short court process where Madam Justice Anne MacKenzie committed Mr. Emery for surrender to the United States.

This month, Mr. Emery reached a plea agreement to serve a five-year prison term for selling marijuana seeds to U.S. customers. The next step is for the federal Justice Minister to order his surrender.

But before he surrendered himself, Mr. Emery told supporters and a horde of reporters outside the court that he was hopeful the minister wouldn't approve the extradition.

“And if they do sign, they must be punished in the next election,” he said.

If that doesn't work, Mr. Emery is hoping he'll be transferred to serve his time at home under an agreement between Canada and the United States that allows prisoners to serve time in their home country.

“I would be out on the street with you a year from now if I'm transferred back to Canada as a non-violent first offender in the federal system,” he said.

He conceded that the Conservative government has so far refused to repatriate any Canadian convicted in the United States of a marijuana offence. “That bodes poorly for me,” Mr. Emery told reporters.

He doesn't deny selling the seeds to U.S. customers – in fact, he said he did so deliberately.

“I'm proud of representing the cannabis culture,” he told the crowd outside the courthouse. “There's no crime … the crime is we have a government that continues to hand a huge business over to the underground, the criminal element as a matter of public policy.” He said politicians who support marijuana prohibition are supporters of organized crime.

Ms. Emery told the crowd she was devastated her husband was going to prison and furious with the Canadian government. “Help bring my husband back home to me please,” the weeping woman said.

Ms. Emery said her husband is a political prisoner because when he was arrested on the U.S. charges, the American prosecutor issued a news release saying the arrest was a significant blow to the marijuana legalization movement.

“When you consider that there are people moving tons of cocaine and damaging harmful drugs and weapons … this is insulting,” she said. “Nobody should go to prison for a plant.”

Two of Mr. Emery's co-accused, Michelle Rainey and Greg Williams, were sentenced to two years probation in a Seattle court last July for helping Mr. Emery mail the pot seeds to the United States.

Mr. Emery hopes his supporters will make it “politically unpalatable” to keep him incarcerated.

He is the publisher of Cannabis Culture Magazine and owns the Cannabis Culture store which sells everything from T-shirts to “herbal equipment.” He has run for political office under the Marijuana Party banner and has taken part in protests across the country in an effort to decriminalize pot.

He's been arrested more than a dozen times across the country because of his marijuana activism, and spent three months in Saskatoon Correction Centre.

“I didn't like being there while I was there, but I had many epiphanies and revelations about myself,” he said. “So I hope I can make good use of that time in more awkward circumstances in the United States.”




#23 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 07:14 PM

Western Standard


Monday, September 28, 2009

Marc Emery turns himself in to be extradited


http://ca.reuters.co...-MARIJUANA.jpeg


Today marks a horrible day for those of us who have worked with, become friends with, appreciated, and looked up to a Canadian hero for individual liberty. Marc Emery, often called the "Prince of Pot," presented himself to the authorities in order to be extradited to the U.S. to face five years in prison for selling marijuana seeds in the mail to Americans.

Marc Emery was a columnist with the Western Standard, and a personal friend to all of us on the editorial board. It is shattering to see pictures of him in newspapers, surrounded by friends and fans, knowing that he's about to spend many years in a prison for a fake "crime." And it is a fake crime.

William Hopper penned a wonderful story for the Western Standard about Emery's extradition back in January of last year entitled "Seeding Sovereignty." And we've debated Emery's activities here on the Shotgun blog many, many, many times.

Instead of recapitulating a lot of the arguments that I've made in the past, I thought I'd post Freedom Party International's press statement. Marc Emery was one of the founders of the Freedom Party (which is not the same as Freedom Party International), and has had a long association with that political party. Here is the statement they issued today:

On behalf of Freedom Party International (FPI), spokespersons Paul McKeever and Robert Metz issued the following statement:

FPI is today calling upon the Canadian and U.S. governments to discard plans to extradite and imprison Canadian citizen Marc Emery.

For his entire adult life, Marc Emery has been a vocal and animated advocate of individual freedom. He has campaigned on a very wide range of issues concerning individual liberty and property rights. He has successfully campaigned to save the taxpayer millions of dollars that would otherwise have been wasted on white elephants; he has challenged the abuses inflicted by garbage collection unions upon the citizenry; he has opposed the now-repealed ban on Sunday Shopping in Ontario (he is the only man ever to have gone to jail for opening his store on Sunday contrary to the law); he has fought censorship, by importing and selling a rap music album by the rap group "The Two Live Crew", and by selling prohibited books in Canada concerning the history of marijuana prohibition. In the 1990s, he chose to focus his efforts on the prohibition of one peaceful activity that so clearly violates the liberty of every individual, and that has resulted in the criminalization and incarceration of millions of people: the manufacture, sale, possession and use of cannabis.

With his decision to oppose cannabis prohibition, Emery has strayed from his previous focus on individual rights. He has instead resorted to provocation and agitation in an attempt to build sympathy for himself and for victims of prohibition, and to provoke anger against politicians, parties, and governments that have advocated cannabis prohibition, or that have done nothing to repeal it. FPI is not a political party per se, but a philosophical organization that advocates rational governance. As such, we reject Emery's emotion-focused strategy and tactics.

However, we stand by and defend Emery on philosophical grounds. A human being's defining feature is his or her capacity to reason. In our view, it is morally right that a human being put his own survival and the pursuit of his own happiness first, and we assert that a person cannot do that if he is not free to act upon the rational conclusions of his own mind. To that end, we assert that the proper role of government is to ensure that no person obtains any values from any other person without that person's consent. We quite agree that it is morally wrong to use marijuana, or any substance, in an attempt to avoid facing reality and dealing with it. However, in a free country, the government does not punish people simply for making foolish or self-destructive decisions so long as those decisions do not involve violations of another person's liberty or property.

In early 2008, U.S. authorities agreed with Emery to a deal in which Emery would serve a five year term for violations of U.S. prohibition laws, but would serve it on Canadian soil. On Canadian soil, he would have been released on parole within a year. However, the Conservative government of Canada refused to agree to the deal. For that reason, Emery is now faced with being imprisoned in a U.S. facility for a full five-year term. FPI condemns the U.S. government's decision to prosecute Emery, and the Conservative government's refusal to agree to the U.S. offer to allow him to stay on Canadian soil. We call upon the Conservative government of Canada to revisit that decision and communicate with U.S. authorities so as to ensure that Emery never has to spend any time in a U.S. facility. We call upon opposition parties in the Canadian House of Commons to demand of the federal Conservatives that they defend the sovereignty -- and thereby, the liberty -- of Canadians by taking all necessary steps to ensure that Emery is not sent to a U.S. prison. We call upon the Obama administration to take all steps necessary to have the charges against Marc Emery dropped. And we call upon governments and legislatures in both countries to put an end to cannabis prohibition."

Posted by P.M. Jaworski on September 28, 2009


#24 medpot

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 07:24 PM

Drug War Chronicle


Free Marc Emery!! Canada's Prince of Pot Has
Begun His Journey Into America's Gulag



Posted in Chronicle Blog by Phillip Smith on Mon, 09/28/2009 - 5:30pm


Marc Emery is no longer a free man. Canada's Prince of Pot was taken into custody today. He turned himself in at the BC Supreme Court in Vancouver, and is now jailed in Vancouver awaiting imminent extradition to the US, where he is set to plead guilty to one count of marijuana distribution for selling pot seeds over the Internet.

Emery is expected to be sentenced to five years in federal prison in the US for his seed sales. He sold millions of seeds in the decade prior to his 2005 arrest and became a leading hemispheric advocate for marijuana legalization, using the profits from his seed sales to fund reformers across the continent.

He also called out then drug czar John Walters for lying about marijuana and interfering in Canadian domestic politics, leading then DEA head Karen Tandy to issue this press release lauding his arrest as a blow to the legalization movement:

Today's DEA arrest of Marc Scott Emery, publisher of Cannabis Culture Magazine, and the founder of a marijuana legalization group -- is a signficant blow not only to the marijuana trafficking trade in the U.S. and Canada, but also to the marijuana legalization movement.

His marijuana trade and propagandist marijuana magazine have generated nearly $5 million a year in profits that bolstered his trafficking efforts, but those have gone up in smoke today.

Emery and his organization had been designated as one of the Attorney General's most wanted international drug trafficking organizational targets -- one of only 46 in the world and the only one from Canada.

Hundreds of thousands of dollars of Emery's illicit profits are known to have been channeled to marijuana legalization groups active in the United States and Canda. Drug legalization lobbyists now have one less pot of money to rely on.

Can you say politically motivated? I knew you could.

One American attorney familiar with his case told me this weekend that Emery could have fought the prosecution and sought to have shown that it was unlawfully politically motivated, but that Emery and his Canadian legal team didn't want to take that risk. That's understandable, given that Emery was looking at decades or even life in prison if he lost.

Now, America's legions of unknown marijuana martyrs are being joined by one very big name. Let's hope that Emery's unjust imprisonment turns a spotlight on the hideousness of a US federal legal system that turns a blind eye to torture but cages a man for selling pot seeds.

The Vancouver Sun's Ian Mulgrew sums it up nicely in an op-ed piece entitled Marc Emery's Sentence Reeks of Injustice and Mocks Our Sovreignty:

After two decades as Canada's Prince of Pot, Marc Emery will surrender himself today in B.C. Supreme Court and become the country's first Marijuana Martyr.

Emery will begin serving what could be as long as five years behind bars as Uncle Sam's prisoner for a crime that in Canada would have earned him at most a month in the local hoosegow.

It is a legal tragedy that in my opinion marks the capitulation of our sovereignty and underscores the hypocrisy around cannabis.

Emery hasn't even visited America but he was arrested in July 2005 at the request of a Republican administration that abhorred his politics.

He is being handed over to a foreign government for an activity we are loath to prosecute because we don't think selling seeds is a major problem.

There are at least a score of seed-sellers downtown and many, many more such retail outlets across the country.

In the days ahead, once the federal justice minister signs the extradition papers, Emery will be frog-marched south to Seattle where his plea bargain will be rubber-stamped and he will be sent to a U.S. penitentiary.

For comparison, consider that the B.C. Court of Appeal last year said a one-month jail sentence plus probation was appropriate punishment for drug and money-laundering offences of this ilk.

The last time Emery was convicted in Canada of selling pot seeds, back in 1998, he was given a $2,000 fine.

There's more at the link above, but you get the gist. Mulgrew, of course, is right on the money. The Canadian government has shamefully failed to protect one of its citizens from the crazed drug war machine south of the border, and the US government is shamelessly imprisoning yet another non-violent pot person--this time mainly to shut him up.

We should demand that Marc Emery and all other marijuana prisoners be immediately released. Short of that, we should, as Emery requests, demand that he be allowed to serve his time at home in a Canadian prison.




#25 papapuff

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 08:05 PM

seabc79



Marc Emery Turns Himself In, Tears Of Hope




Morning News@ Noon News, Marc Emery Turns himself in




BC PROFILE CBC NEWS, Marc Emery Turns Himself In




Jodie Emery CTV Interview






#26 Guest_Poter Principle_*

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 08:15 PM

My wife sent this comment to the CBC, which has received in the several hundreds of comments.

Today's events brought me to tears. And then - infuriated me.

In these times, with all we know about cannabinoid receptor physiology, with all the various and repeated scientific studies, the Senate reports and recommendations; with all we know about the harms of prohibition, the incidents of political hypocrisy, the corruption ...

It appalls me that some still doubt the message and / or question the medical efficacy of the plant.

What will it take?

Perhaps news that the 'United States of America represented by the Department of Health and Human Services' holds TWO patents on cannabinoids might serve as proof?

http://www.patentsto...escription.html
http://www.patentsto...5/fulltext.html

There are hundreds of other like-patents issued to Universities and Big Pharma. This plant is the most researched of any.

Enough with the BS - legislators, scientists, pharmacological companies, ALL KNOW what we know. They just haven't yet figured out how to exploit it.

The fact that patents can exist on a plant is, in itself, CRAZY- but that discussion can wait for another day.

Today we mourn Canadian Sovereignty, we mourn for Marc, Jodie and all the activists who face this injustice and meet these challenges on our behalf - every flippin' day of their lives.



peace and pot

#27 papapuff

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 08:48 PM

seabc79


Marc Emery National News




Marc Emery Turns Himself In CBC news





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Posted 28 September 2009 - 09:27 PM

Metro Canada - Vancouver



'My only regret is that I couldn’t do more'


SlideShow

METRO VANCOUVER
September 29, 2009 12:36 a.m.

With his wife Jodie at his side, Prince of Pot Marc Emery ended his last press conference as a free person yesterday by raising his hand to his temple and saluting supporters outside B.C.’s Supreme Court.

“I feel proud about everything that I’ve done,” Emery told reporters before he entered the Law Courts and surrendered himself for extradition to the U.S.

“I don’t feel bad about anything. I won’t be repentant. I won’t be apologizing to any judge. My only regret is that I couldn’t do more.”

Emery, 51, will be extradited – a process that should take about a month – as part of a deal that will see him plead guilty in a Seattle courtroom to one count of conspiracy to manufacture marijuana.

Emery said he faces a five-year prison sentence in an “alien jail,” but added he could be back on the streets in a year’s time if he is transferred back to Canada to serve his sentence.

The long-time pot activist was arrested in 2005 at the request of U.S. agents for allegedly selling marijuana seeds through the mail.

“I’m being made to pay,” Emery said. “I did sell those seeds so that people could overgrow the government.”

He claims he gave away $4 million, from 1994 to 2005, in support of marijuana advocacy and political campaigns.

He is the leader of the B.C. Marijuana Party; the publisher of Cannabis Culture Magazine; and the owner of the Cannabis Culture Headquarters store on Hastings Street.

“I’m the Prince of Pot for a good reason,” Emery said. “I’ve probably run the largest scale revolution that has no bodies.

There are no victims, no dead people in my revolution that is fronted by a beautiful plant.”


#29 Guest_Poter Principle_*

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 10:43 PM

I sent this to the Vancouver Sun:

To the Editor,

This is trivial in some respects, but it brings home a point. Marc Emery never proclaimed himself the Prince of Pot. He accepted the title after it was hatched at CNN. The exact date is hard to find. It's an apt given Emery history of social activism.

No one except Jack Herer deserves such a lofty honorific. This pioneer of the Cannabis liberation movement in the US is in critical health following a heart attack recently. It's more than a name game, though. These are men who champion freedom against tyranny. The finest way to honor them is to speak out against tyranny, and stop voting their henchmen into office.

Respectfully,

as well as this to all:

Marc Emery's impending extradition is a fraud, and our fawning government is complicit.

In 2003, the US government acquired a patent for cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectors. http://www.patentsto...escription.html. This is an explicit confirmation of its recognition as medicine.

While the DEA was investigating Marc Emery for the sole purpose of his extradition, and since they've been lying through their teeth that Cannabis has no accepted medical value. Not accepted by them.

Canada handing over Emery is one of many cases of the increasing erosion of our sovereignty. Look up the Const. David Laing or the White Rock cases.

The US and Canadian governments are complicit in hate crimes and genocide against the Cannabis culture.

Cannabis is the most studied medicinal plant on Earth. Hundreds of patents have been issued to universities and pharmaceutical companies.

The darker side of human nature is behind prohibition, as they relentlessly seek to control us. This predatory cult is getting overgrown.

Respectfully,


peace and pot

#30 medpot

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 04:34 AM

The Nanaimo Daily News

Letters to the editor: letters@nanaimodailynews.com


EDITORIAL


'King of Pot's' punishment was no surprise



The Daily News
Published: Tuesday, September 29, 2009


Nobody should shed any tears for Canada's self-proclaimed "Prince of Pot."

Marc Emery was escorted out of B.C. Supreme Court and into jail Monday to await extradition to the U.S., where he could serve up to five years in prison for shipping marijuana seeds across the border.

Emery was indicted in 2005 along with two associates on drug and money-laundering charges stemming from a lucrative mail-order pot-seed business run out of Emery's Vancouver book and paraphernalia shop, which doubled as B.C.'s Marijuana Party headquarters.

In March 2008, the federal government decided to turn down a plea arrangement, which would have had him serve his time in this country.

Emery repeatedly broke both Canadian and American laws. This country's legal system did not have the gall to arrest him for openly smoking marijuana in public, selling marijuana seeds and encouraging others to break Canada's marijuana possession laws.

Regardless of what people think about Emery's impending jail time in the United States, nobody forced him to send his seeds across the border.

He did so willingly, knowing he was breaking the law in that country and he did it for profit, regardless of his claims of a more selfless motive.

As far as American authorities are concerned, Emery is nothing more than a drug pusher.

He could have faced life imprisonment but Emery decided to sign a plea deal for a five-year sentence in the American federal prison system.

Those who think Canada should not allow the Americans to extradite Emery need to realize that extradition treaties work both ways. They are a tool that allow Canada's law-enforcement agents to request American authorities hand over people who may have broken Canadian law, either on our soil or theirs.

Many passionately argue that possessing pot should not be illegal.

That is not the issue in Emery's case.

The issue is this country's obligation to live up to the terms of the extradition treaties we have signed with the U.S. and other countries.

We certainly wouldn't like it if an American citizen used the Internet to lure a Canadian minor into the U.S. Canadians would be outraged if American authorities refused to hand over such a person and they would rightly point to the extradition law and say the U.S. was obligated.

Let's face it, Emery's never-ending grandstanding created a dilemma for the Canadian government. He forced the Conservative government's hand and may have actually helped them prove they are living up to their law-and-order election promises.

As the leader of B.C.'s Marijuana Party, it is ironic Emery has become a political pawn and not a politician in his crusade to decriminalize pot.

And make no mistake about it, he is a pawn in the political chess game waged by liberals and conservatives on both sides of the 49th parallel.

It was the previous American administration, led by George W. Bush, that indicted Emery in 2005. Bush was first elected to office in 2001.

Emery started selling his seeds across the line for many years before that.

To make matters worse for the pot crusader, a few months after the Americans issued their indictment, Stephen Harper was elected prime minister.

Still, he continued to put himself in the spotlight, daring authorities to do something about his blatant disregard for both countries' drug laws. Emery led rallies in Vancouver and urged others across the world to partake of his favourite weed.

His misguided supporters consider him a martyr for the cause of marijuana decriminalization. He is nothing of the sort. Emery is a calculating businessman who flouted the law.

His punishment should be a surprise to no one.



© The Daily News (Nanaimo) 2009


#31 medpot

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 04:42 AM

The Victoria Times Colonist

Letters to the Editor

COLUMN


U.S. drug war invades Canada



Times Colonist September 29, 2009 1:16 AM


Marc Emery has surrendered to authorities and will soon be in an American prison, serving up to five years for the crime of shipping marijuana seeds across the border from Canada.

His incarceration will do nothing to stem the flow of drugs -- most more hazardous than pot -- to U.S. cities and it is not likely that any Americans who bought from him would even consider themselves as his victims.

But in putting Emery behind bars, the American authorities will claim a major victory in their war on drugs. They will also have set a shining example, a warning to anyone else who might think that selling illicit drugs could be a way to vast riches at no risk.

Let's be clear: Emery should not be seen as a hero or even a marijuana martyr, as he has been dubbed. He has simply been mixing the promotion of a business -- the sale of seeds -- with single-issue politics, namely the legalization of marijuana, for many years. His in-your-face style has been a key ingredient in his success, which in turn led to his downfall.

Emery has been on the leading edge of the fight for more liberal marijuana laws. As a result, he made many friends and many enemies.

He sent copies of his catalogues to politicians. He paid taxes on his pot-seed income. He did everything he could to legitimize his business, even after being convicted in 1998 of selling pot seeds. His fine was $2,000.

But that was in Canada, where we don't worry about marijuana as much as the Americans do.

Emery's mistake -- whether it was just another way to make money, or to make a statement -- was to sell those seeds into the U.S. through the mail.

He was indicted in July 2005, along with two associates, and charged with conspiracy to distribute marijuana and conspiracy to engage in money laundering. Those charges were dropped when Emery agreed to plead guilty to a charge of conspiracy to manufacture marijuana.

No matter what we think of Emery or of marijuana, this is a disturbing case.

A Canadian who did not leave Canada has been found guilty under American law and will serve time in the U.S.

In Canada, his punishment would have been a month in jail, assuming he had been arrested in the first place. (Bear in mind that Health Canada had recommended that medical marijuana patients get their seeds from Emery. His business had a stamp of approval from the federal government.)

Yet Canadian authorities rushed to help the Americans go after Emery. As a result, he is being delivered to a U.S. prison and can be expected to serve a tough sentence.

It's acceptable to shoot heroin in Victoria; you can even ask for a free needle. Selling marijuana seeds to someone south of the border? That's the go-to-jail card. Our attitudes toward drugs are so inconsistent that it's surprising anyone can keep them straight.

Canada had legitimate options that would have avoided this outcome. Instead, the government willing compromised sovereignty and helped bring the costly, futile U.S. war on drugs across the border.


© Copyright © The Victoria Times Colonist


#32 medpot

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 04:58 AM

Examiner.com (Denver, CO)


The martyrdom of Canadian Marc Emery: For selling seeds



Posted Image

September 28, 11:03 PM Liberal Issues Examiner William Skordelis


Posted Image


According to his own website http://www.cannabisculture.com and the Associated Press, Marc Emery, “The Prince of Pot” surrendered himself at the B.C. Supreme Court in downtown Vancouver in Canada this morning.

Marc Emery will sit in a Vancouver jail for about one week or up to 60 days until the Canadian federal Justice Minister, Robert Nicholson signs an extradition order to turn him over to the U.S. Justice system to face the charges and punishment negotiated into Marc Emery’s plea agreement.

Fighting felony drug trafficking and money laundering charges by the DEA since 2005, Marc Emery, longtime political activist, and Canadian cannabis seed salesman extraordinaire, has made his fight against extradition to the United States equal to his fight against marijuana prohibition. Under his deal with the U.S. Prosecutors in Seattle, he agreed to plead guilty to one charge of marijuana distribution for his worldwide internet cannabis seed sales empire, for five years, but more importantly, in order to have all other charges against him dropped. Had he not signed the plea agreement Emery could have faced life imprisonment, for selling seeds; life imprisonment, for selling seeds, and paying taxes on the sale of those seeds to the government in charge.

The U.S. government signed a five year minimum plea deal with Marc Emery for two reasons. Five years to get enough jail time in court to appear tough on crime, and to keep him in jail for as short a time as possible, because while he is in jail, Marc Emery is a dangerous martyr that will be used by the anti-prohibitionists to plead their case for legalization.

That’s the problem for the U.S. Justice Department, out of jail they consider Marc Emery dangerous, in jail he is maybe more dangerous, and truly martyred he is the most dangerous of all.

The Justice Department’s conundrum of Marc Emery is caused by one simple concept, and that is the concept that finding satisfaction in life by one means or another is considered wrong, somehow immoral, and thus dangerous. Marc Emery’s last 16 years have been dedicated to stopping the government’s prohibition of a weed that grows almost anywhere, has proven medical benefits, and worst of all, it makes people feel better.

What a crime. Yeah, he should be put away for a long, long time. Good going guys.

Coming soon: Commentary by William Skordelis, Getting High: We all do it, even you.


Photo credit: FREE MARC poster downloaded freely at http://www.cannabisculture.com



#33 medpot

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 05:07 AM

The Toronto Star


Prince of Pot heads to joint in U.S.



Sep 29, 2009 04:30 AM
Petti Fong
Western Canada Bureau


Posted Image
LYLE STAFFORD FOR THE TORONTO STAR
Marc Emery gets a hug Sept. 28, 2009 in Vancouver before
he goes to jail.



VANCOUVER–He saluted his supporters crowded in a Vancouver courtroom to see him off, told his wife he loved her and then the self-proclaimed Prince of Pot gave one last defiant rallying cry.

"Plant the seeds of freedom. Overgrow the government, everyone," Marc Emery yelled out as sheriffs led him away to jail.

After years of flouting marijuana laws in Canada, openly smoking bongs in public and making millions off a marijuana seed empire that funded a magazine and an unsuccessful political party, Emery turned himself in to police in Vancouver Monday.

He pleaded guilty earlier this year and made a deal to serve a five-year prison term in the U.S. after being pursued by American authorities for selling seeds through the mail.

Emery, 51, will be in Canadian custody before being turned over to American authorities in Washington state. But he's making a last-ditch attempt to get his supporters to lobby federal Justice Minister Rob Nicholson to stop the extradition or allow him to serve his sentence in Canada.

Emery, who called himself the most visible face of cannabis culture, said his incarceration will motivate millions of Americans to back him.

There were rallies last weekend to protest his arrest in various cities and countries, but nearly all of them drew small crowds. In Vancouver, where Emery's business is based, only 150 people showed up.

"I've probably run the largest-scale revolution that has had no bodies. There are no victims, no dead people, in my revolution," said Emery. "This is a revolution fronted by a beautiful plant. The world's most beloved plant."

Emery has been arrested 18 times and served three months in a Saskatoon prison.




#34 S^N

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 07:30 AM

The National Post


'Prince of pot' awaits extradition to U.S.


Canwest News Service Published: Tuesday, September 29, 2009


Posted Image
A supporter embraces Marc Emery, right, at a Vancouver
courthouse yesterday. He faces a five-year jail sentence in
the United States for shipping marijuana seeds across the
border.

Andy Clark, Reuters



VANCOUVER - Canada's self-proclaimed "Prince of Pot" was escorted out of B.C. Supreme Court and into jail yesterday to await extradition to the United States, where he is to serve up to five years in prison for shipping marijuana seeds across the border.

Marc Emery, 51, was indicted in 2005 along with two associates on drug and money-laundering charges stemming from a lucrative mail-order pot-seed business run out of Emery's Vancouver book and paraphernalia shop, which also doubled as B.C.'s Marijuana Party headquarters.

Two charges Emery faced -- conspiracy to distribute marijuana and conspiracy to engage in money laundering -- were dropped in exchange for his guilty plea on the charge of conspiracy to manufacture marijuana.

He has agreed to a five-year imprisonment plea bargain in connection with his $3-million-a-year marijuana seed catalogue business, whose customers were mostly American.

Canadian authorities drew criticism for helping the United States nab Emery because he openly participated in an operation that drew little heat in Canada.

Emery was convicted in Canada of selling pot seeds in 1998 and given a $2,000 fine.

Emery's two associates, Michelle Rainey, 38, and Gregory Williams, 54, were recently sentenced in the United States to two years' probation for conspiracy to manufacture marijuana as a result of a plea deal.

As Emery left the tiny courtroom, his wife, Jody, wept in the public gallery while a crowd of the cannabis crusader's followers chanted: "Free Marc Emery!"

As he was led away, he yelled: "I love you Jody Emery. Plant the seeds of freedom; overgrow the government!"

Emery will be held for 30 days to give him time to appeal and then, once the federal justice minister has signed the removal order, Emery will be handed over to the United States.

Now dubbed the country's first "marijuana martyr," Emery recently wrapped up a 30-city "farewell tour" across Canada.

He is hoping a transfer agreement allowing Canadians convicted and jailed in the United States to serve their time back home will play in his favour.

"The same seeds I sold are being sold right in America.... There's a terrible hypocrisy at work here," said Emery. "There isn't a single victim in my case, no one who can stand up and say, 'I was hurt by Marc Emery.' No one."




#35 medpot

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Posted 29 September 2009 - 10:23 AM

U S DEA Public Enemy #1 Marc Emery's last free seconds



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Posted 29 September 2009 - 11:44 AM

My heart bleeds for both Marc and Jodie :(

I just wonder how much stir it will cause among our MP's in Ottawa, but I surely hope that a majority of them will pressure our federal justice minister to refuse to sign for the extradition of Marc.

If Marc did a crime, it was done on Canadian territory, and the harshest punishment he would get here for selling marijuana seeds is far less compared to U.S .

I thought that our Canadian Charter of Rights protected Canadians from being extradited to other countries if the punishment was harsher than in our own country, but on many points, ignoring our Charter rights and Public Opinion has always been a Harper government specialty since they are in power - and it's not hard to prove!


Marc


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Posted 29 September 2009 - 03:58 PM

Alberni Valley Times

Letters to the Editor: CCowan@avtimes.net


OPINION


There's more collateral damage than victories in this War on Drugs



Shayne Morrow, Alberni Valley Times
Published: Tuesday, September 29, 2009


Just a random sampling of headlines should be enough to convince the average reader that there's no winners in the war on drugs. At least, not on the side of the alleged good guys.

This week, pot activist Marc Emery was to surrender himself to Canadian authorities, who will in turn transport him to their counterparts in the U.S., where he will serve five years in prison for selling millions of dollars worth of marijuana seeds by mail.

One can debate the rightness or wrongness of Emery's business, or the wisdom of marketing anything drug-related in the States, where even puffers can end up doing hard time.

But it was legal in Canada, and ultimately, it took the complicity of the Canadian government to bring about Emery's arrest, and it required some pressure to elicit a guilty plea, in exchange for allowing two co-defendants to go free. The DEA got their man, at what cost to our legal sovereignty?

When U.S. president Ronald Reagan famously declared the War on Drugs, it's not like we didn't have a good historical template for what to expect. When the U.S. government declared Prohibition shortly after WW I, several things happened. First, people who wanted to drink alcohol went to great lengths to get it. To supply their thirst, a haphazard collection of semi-organized criminals became increasingly innovative and ruthless. Drinkers made it fashionable to flout the law, everybody knew a bootlegger and rum-runners became respectable businessmen.

What society learned was that you cannot cut the supply if the demand is still there. Somebody forgot to tell the politicians that, when you declare war, the bad guys just get badder.

According to some statisticians, alcohol consumption actually did decline slightly during Prohibition, but the social consequences of that war are still with us. It's hard to believe anyone is going to try to sell us on the idea that drug consumption has gone down since the 1980s, when Ronald Reagan got tough on drugs and Nancy Reagan told us to Just Say No.

This week, in a hail of gunfire, the Royal Navy intercepted a drug boat carrying five tons of cocaine. The street value is estimated at over $400 million. If the bust has any tangible effect on the street, it will only be to increase the price on the coke that did make it through. But that's unlikely.

Five tons? Think about it. If any single dealer can put together five tons of the stuff in one shipment, one can only imagine the sheer volume that's moving around out there. Think of the demand that makes the risk worth it. Because if we learned anything during Prohibition, it's that the demand will be filled, massive profits will be made and consumers will learn to thumb their noses at the law. Yes, a few unlucky folks will go to jail. Just the price of doing business.

In the mean time, the combatants in the War on Drugs continue to wreak havoc, oftentimes on the innocent. Just check out the death toll in Mexico: six thousand and counting just in the last year or so. In short, we've successfully outsourced the death and destruction intrinsic to our own taste for illicit drugs. That's not something we can point to with pride.

As mankind has learned over the centuries, it's usually easier to start a war than it is to stop one, short of total destruction. At some point, we're going to have to admit that this whole campaign was ill-considered, and that it's time to come up with an exit plan. But don't hold your breath.

SMorrow@avtimes.net




© Alberni Valley Times 2009


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Posted 29 September 2009 - 08:12 PM

NORML Blog (U.S.)


U.S. DEA Finally Gets Its Man


September 29th, 2009 By: Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director


Posted Image


Just over four years ago, former U.S. DEA administrator Karen Tandy announced to the world that her agency had struck “a significant blow … to the marijuana legalization movement” by indicting Canada’s so-called ‘Prince of Pot,’ Marc Emery.

For nearly two decades Emery operated a successful marijuana seed bank operation in Vancouver, British Columbia — a venture which he used to directly fund cannabis law reform efforts around the globe, including the magazine Cannabis Culture, the internet site Pot TV, and the founding of the British Columbia Marijuana Party.

Emery’s seed business was hardly a secret. For many years, Emery mailed copies of his seed catalogue to Canadian politicians. A Canadian court convicted him in 1998 and sentenced him to a $2,000 fine. Undeterred, Emery continued to sell seeds — and pay federal taxes on his profits — up until his arrest. Canadian authorities were happy to accept his tax money, and officials at Health Canada, which oversees Canada’s legal medical marijuana program, often recommended that patients contact Emery for grow advice. Nevertheless, when the Feds came calling, the Canadian authorities were swift to throw Marc Emery to the wolves.

Even though Emery’s alleged crimes would have warranted, at most, a month in jail in his home country, Canadian authorities yesterday placed Marc into custody so that he can be extradited to the United States. Once here, he faces up to five years in prison for pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to manufacture marijuana (more than 100 plants) in violation of 21 USC 841(a)(1) and 841(b)(1)(B).

But lets not kid ourselves. Marc Emery was hardly a high level target because he sold marijuana seeds to the U.S. — a simple google search will yield dozens of listings of competitors that presently engage in similar activities. No, it wasn’t so much what Marc did (”There isn’t a single victim in my case, no one who can stand up and say, ‘I was hurt by Marc Emery.’ No one,” he told the Vancouver Sun) as it was what he did with his money that aroused the ire of U.S. anti-drug officials.

And we have Karen Tandy’s own words to prove it.




#39 medpot

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 04:59 AM

Western Standard


The Shotgun Blog

Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Marc Emery left his mark on Edmonton
conservatives. So where are they now?



Monday was an exceedingly sad day for advocates of freedom.

Western Standard publisher Peter Jaworski reported here that libertarian publisher and activist Marc Emery surrendered himself to Canadian authorities for extradition to the U.S. on charges related to selling marijuana seeds. Emery is expected to serve at least five years in a U.S. prison after a deal was struck to spare his co-accused, Michelle Rainey and Craig Williams, from any jail time. Rainey and Williams were principals in Emery’s Vancouver-based marijuana seed distribution business, the profits from which funded much of the marijuana policy reform movement in Canada and abroad.

The extradition process is expected to take about a month, during which time Emery will be held at the North Fraser Pretrial Centre in Port Coquitlam east of Vancouver.

Emery’s fate now rests entirely with Justice Minister Rob Nicholson, who has the authority and legal grounds to refuse to extradite the marijuana policy reformer. Nicholson could instead charge and prosecute Emery in Canada for activities related to his marijuana seed business, a move that would assert Canada’s sovereignty over drug policy and likely lead to a sentence that better reflects the values of Canadians toward marijuana prohibition.

Nicholson, however, is not likely to assert Canadian sovereignty over drug policy or defend Canadian attitudes toward marijuana. Under Prime Minister Stephen Harper, the government has passed mandatory minimum sentencing laws for marijuana and other drug offences and increased funding for the war on drugs.

While the Harper Conservatives have chosen to use marijuana policy as a political weapon against their easily frightened political opponents with ties to the marijuana legalization movement, Canada’s conservative movement before Harper was open to discussing drug policy reform. In fact, they were open to having this discussion with Emery, a man they are now prepared sacrifice in order to enhance Canada-US relations and scare up a few more conservative votes.

On September 1, 2000, I hosted a reception at the Fairmont Hotel Macdonald entitled "Reassessing the War on Drugs." The keynote speakers were Patrick Basham of the Fraser Institute and Emery, publisher of Cannabis Culture magazine which has subsequently gone entirely online. In his coverage of the event entitled “The Right Wing Makes Its Case For Legal Dope”, See Magazine editor at the time, Andrew Hanon, now an Edmonton Sun columnist, wrote:

Crystal chandeliers, lace curtains and 36-foot domed ceilings. Shimmering, full-length evening gowns. Immaculate European suits and silk ties. The only thing missing was the chamber orchestra. On the surface, it looked like any swanky gathering of the business and social élite in any Canadian city. But this event, held last week at the Hotel Macdonald in downtown Edmonton, was very, very different.

There was no discussion of the local charitable cause du jour. No one railed against the exorbitant price of live Atlantic lobster. Not a single word was uttered about the difficulty of attracting good help these days. The 60 people who paid $25 each to be at the Mac that evening were there to talk about the pressing need to legalize dope. That’s right. Buddha. Chronic. Cannabis. Pot.

The soirée, organized by Teaching Liberty Inc., a local political consulting firm, was entitled Reassessing the War On Drugs. On the speakers list were Patrick Basham of the Fraser Institute (really!) and – more predictably – Marc Emery, noted pot pundit and publisher of Cannabis Culture magazine. Also present was a panel made up of criminal defence lawyer Rod Gregory, the Canadian Taxpayers Federation’s Mitch Grey, CHED producer Rob Breakinridge and Paul Bunner of Report newsmagazine.

Teaching Liberty Inc.’s Matthew Johnston acknowledged that the public rarely equates right-wing activists with the fight to decriminalize drugs, but argued that it’s actually a natural fit.

"We organized the event to demonstrate growing conservative opposition to the war on drugs," he explained. No resolutions were made that night – the evening’s sole purpose was to create more awareness of the issue.

There is an increasing trend on the political right toward social liberalism – they want government out of private citizens’ pocketbooks and their personal affairs. They see issues such as gay marriage and drug use as questions of personal choice, not government regulation.

Basham was introduced that night by Canadian Alliance MP Ian McClelland. (MP Peter Goldring was also in attendance, but is not an advocate for liberalizing marijuana laws.) Emery was introduced by lawyer Tom Ross, who was Ezra Levant’s lawyer in his legal defence against the Alberta Human Rights Commission over the Western Standard’s decision to publish images of the Muslim prophet Muhammad.

Panellist Bunner is now on staff with the Harper government. And before working for the CTF, Grey worked for Deborah Grey (no relation), the Reform Party’s first MP.

This single event provides powerful anecdotal evidence of the willingness of prominent conservative leaders to embrace drug policy reform, and radical reformers like Emery. It’s also a reminder of how far things have shifted away from a common sense approach to drug policy within conservative partisan politics under Harper, where now even tobacco is being banned.

I would suggest that if all the advocates for marijuana policy reform in the Conservative caucus were to make their opposition to Emery’s extradition known, Harper and Justice Minister Nicholson would be left with the support of a small group of ignorant authoritarians with as much insight into Western legal principles as an Iranian Mullah.

I’ll conclude this post with the words Basham used to conclude his speech that evening in 2000:

May I suggest to you this evening that, unless we end the War on Drugs, we're not going to be drug-free -- just un-free.

Posted by Matthew Johnston

Posted by Western Standard on September 30, 2009



#40 medpot

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 05:13 AM

Drug War Chronicle (U.S.)


Marc Emery is in Jail for His Politics, Not His Pot Seeds



Posted in Chronicle Blog by Scott Morgan on Tue, 09/29/2009 - 10:30pm


We've been over this before, but as Marc Emery begins his journey through the American criminal justice system, I want to make sure everyone understands exactly why this is happening. It isn't because he sold lots of pot seeds and mailed them to customers in the United States. He did that, but it isn't what got him in trouble. Marc Emery was targeted for his marijuana reform advocacy and former DEA Administrator Karen Tandy even bragged about it:

"Today's arrest of Mark (sic) Scott Emery, publisher of Cannabis Culture magazine and the founder of a marijuana legalization group, is a significant blow not only to the marijuana trafficking trade in the U.S. and Canada, but also to the marijuana legalization movement."

"Hundreds of thousands of dollars of Emery's illicit profits are known to have been channeled to marijuana legalization groups active in the United States and Canada. Drug legalization lobbyists now have one less pot of money to rely on." [Seattle Post-Intelligencer]

It's important to remember this and not get caught up on the fact that, ya know, Marc Emery sold massive amounts of marijuana seeds to Americans. This is absolutely not about selling seeds. As Paul Armentano helpfully points out, you can still order marijuana seeds from Canada. Easily.

All we've accomplished is carving out a bigger market share for Emery's competitors, so there really isn’t even any debate to be had about whether the substance of the specific criminal charges had anything to do with the decision to extradite him and keep him in an American prison for several years at the expense of U.S. taxpayers.

Today, Marc Emery's persecution provides nothing other than an ugly monument to the divisive drug war politics of the Bush era. This is the legacy that John Walters and Karen Tandy leave behind (remember it was Tandy who took down Tommy Chong as well) and it won't soon be possible for us to forget the infinitely vindictive and infantile behavior that characterized the bosses of Bush's drug war.

Yet, I truly believe that the attack on Marc Emery is symptomatic of the very same unhinged, frothing hysteria that has ultimately brought great shame on its authors and irrevocably reframed the drug war debate around the world. Bush's drug warriors destroyed their own credibility by constantly trying to get their names in the paper and, in the process, dealt a tremendous blow to everything they stood for. By the time Marc Emery is released from prison, this will probably be a lot more obvious to everyone than it is today.




#41 medpot

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 06:24 AM

The Toronto Sun

Letters to the Editor: torsun.editor@sunmedia.ca


Letter

Wednesday, September 30, 2009


QUESTIONABLE JUSTICE



Re "Prince of Pot surrenders" (Sept. 29): So Marc Emery gets a five-year prison sentence for selling the seeds of a plant that grows naturally all over this planet, yet Rajiv Dharamdial is stabbed to death and his killer is only sentenced to another eight months in jail ("Weapons ban for killer, 15," Sept. 15). What on Earth is wrong with the justice systems on both sides of the border?

ALAN ROGERS

MISSISSAUGA

(Age seems to be the big problem)


#42 medpot

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 07:02 AM

Excerpted article

The Province

Why do rich people throw lives away?


The Province September 30, 2009 1:06 AM


Posted Image
Marijuana activist Marc Emery cries while hugging a friend
in Vancouver. The self-proclaimed Prince of Pot turned
himself in before being extradited to the United States.

Photograph by: Reuters File Photo, The Province

Join the conversation at: theprovince.com


'Homegrown' Prince of Pot Marc Emery waits in jail for U.S. extradition.

Backchat

Lisa says:

Hopefully, this will mean fewer wasted people behind the wheel. Enough said.

Johnny Rojo says:

Every negative commentator here has anecdotal evidence of the "great" harm in pot as a gateway drug. I was a casual pot smoker years ago, but stopped liking the effect, so I quit. I have known daily pot smokers who seem unaffected emotionally, physically or intellectually. But that's just anecdotal.

You law 'n' order lamebrains ought to try something different from coffee, booze or cigarettes -- like reading books without pictures. By the way, selling pot seeds wasn't illegal in Canada, was it? So why was our government so co-operative with the DEA fascists?

Concerned says:

Canada is normally a country to be proud of, but let me say that yesterday was a disappointment. Marc Emery is a strong Canadian with beliefs many people share.

It's time to realize that times are changing. Pot should be legalized, taxed and sold. It would be so much safer than having our children buy God-knows-what from God-knows-who in the school systems. Marc has been publicly talking about his business for some time now and it is absolutely absurd for the situation to blow up now and allow the U.S. to take advantage of a situation that should be dealt with in Canada.

J says:

He got what he deserved for this. Selling pot seeds and shipping them across the border is illegal. Period. Emery was a loudmouth about it when he was caught. It really doesn't matter if there are places down south that sell the seeds inside the U.S. or not. It's the act of exporting it to the U.S. that's the problem.


© Copyright © The Province


#43 medpot

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 07:18 AM

The Vancouver Sun


Letters 1-2

Provocation from Pot Prince


Vancouver SunSeptember 30, 2009 1:14 AM


Re: Prince of Pot's sentence reeks of injustice and mocks our sovereignty, Sept. 28

Columnist Ian Mulgrew is welcome to his opinion on Marc Emery and the consequences of marijuana use. The Americans are also welcome to their opinion on the consequences of marijuana use.

If there is enough interest, they will make laws dealing with the subject, and they have.

Emery reminds me of the nuisance child who will poke someone with a stick and then run behind the teacher's skirt for protection. Sooner or later, the teacher will recognize that the nuisance needs to be dealt with and will either take action or leave.

In what appears to be an attempt to satiate his unquenchable desire for attention, Emery poked a stick at the U.S. by openly breaking its laws. The teacher has left and now Marc's woebegone face stares out at us from a photo.

Here's another way to look at this: America also has opinions on gun use. Generally, it thinks guns are good and pot is bad. We have a different opinion.

What if self-righteous U.S. gun folk began to sell their wares openly to Canadians in Canada? Would that be acceptable?

Probably not. What Canada would do about it is another matter.

Jeff Ayre

Vancouver

-------------------------------------------------------------

The Vancouver Sun

Letters 2-2


Provocation from Pot Prince


Vancouver Sun September 30, 2009 1:14 AM


Handing Marc Emery over to the United States of America is like arresting the head of Molson's and handing him over to the Saudis because American oilfield workers take beer into that Muslim country.

The extradition of Marc Emery gives public notice to the world that our government is subject to the will of the U.S.

This is a black day in history; Canada as a sovereign nation no longer exists.

David Baughman

Boston Bar

© Copyright © The Vancouver Sun



© Copyright © The Vancouver Sun


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Posted 30 September 2009 - 07:43 AM

Jodie Emery speaks out on Marc's extradition



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Posted 30 September 2009 - 09:41 AM


Cornwall Free News


7 Responses to “Canadian to be Extradited to US over Pot Seed Sales – Marc Emery”


Russell Barth Says:
September 28th, 2009 at 4:40 am
I will be surprised if Emery lives to see 2010. His charisma will likely make him as many enemies as friends, and sadly, we are basically allowing this man to go to another country to die because the US tells us to. We are no longer sovereign. We are the US’s slave.

666577 Says:
September 28th, 2009 at 6:13 am
If Canada Legalized Marijuana they Government could likely recover the National Debit with in 6 months, If done correctly.

But when have we ever known some block head in Ottawa to do anything correctly?

I mean Legalizing it would not stamp out underground sales.. Because once it reaches the shelves the $10.00 Gram becomes 25.00 LOL Look at Bud Light Lime, $15.00 In the US for a 18 pack. $13.50 here for a Six Pack.

grimalot Says:
September 28th, 2009 at 6:52 am
What I cannot believe is that Harper, is basically doing this to get rid of a political opponent. This is my problem with this situation. He (Marc Emery) did his legally run business under full transparency, paid his taxes, he almost got somewhere with the Liberals, whom at the time were not allowing this extradition to happen. And as soon as Harper got into power, now we have this situation of our Prime Minister, turning his back on our country’s citizens.

Last time I checked, I haven’t seen the USA extradite anyone from this country, or any other country for that matter, for sale of seeds. In fact, the responsibility should be borne upon the buyer that was caught ordering the seeds if it is so illegal in that country.

Fact is, Marc did nothing upon the territory of the USA. Also he happens to be the leader of a registered political party. So I just view this as Harper using this advantage to get rid of another political adversary. Especially on such a touchy subject to the Conservatives.

And what does it look like to other country’s leader’s when our government does actions like this towards Marc, and other selected citizens of our country? First off it sets a precedent as far as I’m concerned that our leader will give away any of our citizens to other country’s at the drop of a hat. Second, why should other country’s care about any of our requests when they see that we do not follow our own policies and constitution?

In any case, a great injustice has been done to one of our Fair Citizens for mainly political gain to the parties involved. I hope the government gets held to task for this in the future, for truly being one of the most secretive, and one of the most dangerous governments to our fair society. We are headed into a police state, I keep stating that on many threads. Everyone be warned.

American Says:
September 28th, 2009 at 7:19 am
This is sad that our (American) government will spend millions of dollars to bring this man to “justice”. I am an American and believe this man is actually someone who is willing to stop the drug violence on the streets. In a perfect world marijuana would not be illegal. Instead, today Mexican Drug Cartels reap 60% profits from just marijuana.

I am an American ready to make a change when it comes to the failed Drug War.

Spanner McNeil Says:
September 28th, 2009 at 9:58 am
If Bill C-15 comes to pass in the Senate in the next few weeks it will come as a shock to over 50,000 Canadians a year that they are faced with mandatory prison time. Emerys’ case does high light the fact that the greatest threat to democracy and soverignty remains with the 80% of eligible voters under thirty years old who don’t vote and so the laws are skewed and prohibition remains. Who’s next? Your kid? Mine? His? You? Pot doesn’t kill. French fries with gravy and cheese kills. It’s murder on our health care system too. Ban that.

admin Says:
September 28th, 2009 at 11:59 am
We live in a culture that has bred conformity for generations now. We’ve been lulled by luxury, lights, and pounding music. We’ve been alienated from doing things collectively and instead communicate by sitting in front of a keyboard and screen as you are doing now if you read this.

People don’t know how to even go about showing their feelings about this as a culture; they don’t know how to use their vote and how important it is.

It’s not the cause sometimes it’s the process and if we allow things to be steam rollered then they will.

If we do not learn the lessons from the past they are doomed to be repeated.

grimalot Says:
September 28th, 2009 at 2:46 pm
It made mention to lobby our MP to get a turnaround on this matter, however unfortunately, I do not think the MP’s ears in this riding will be listening.. considering everything else going on lately that they’ve turned their backs on..

But we are headed slowly and slowly into a police state. And for those that care to know, the liberals may have passed bill C-15 on the floor but they are currently blocking this in the senate. Now you have the real reason why Harper is stacking the senate. So he can pass this law and many others without any difficulty, thereby pushing us more and more into that police state. And to those that claim that he will abolish senate, well, I think once he has it stacked in his favor, he will either push all laws through that he wants so as to screw the rest of Canada, before abolishing senate. Or, he will not abolish it and continue on his power grab.

In any case, again, I feel for Marc Emery and his family and what they have to go through, and I really hope Harper and his cronies eventually get their just desserts for turning their backs on one hell of a fine, Canadian Citizen!

Who was whining that Ignatieff is American? Just look at the stance and policies that Harper is adopting. There couldn’t be anything more Un-Canadian, than Harper is right now!




#46 medpot

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 10:18 AM

ChattahBox.com (U.S.)

Contact


Pot Prince’ Sentenced To Serve 5 Years In U.S. Prison


September 30, 2009


Posted Image


Canada (ChattahBox) - An interesting commentary from Canada.com has brought up some excellent points about the case of Marc Emery, the self-proclaimed ‘Prince of Pot’ who has been sentenced to be extradited to the United States to face a 5-year prison sentence for selling seeds across country borders.

The sentence has cause outrage by many pro-legalization advocates in both Canada and the U.S., but as a commentary by Canada.com pointed out, they are missing the plot a bit.

Many who have read my stories in the past know I am fairly biased in my opinion that marijuana should be legalized. But, despite this, I think the decision of Canada’s government to hand over Emery to serve his sentence was absolutely correct.

That is the law. Period.

Emery has been openly selling his products for years, long before this or the last administration took power in the White House. He has mocked and dared prosecutors to do anything about it.

He has done this for profit, nothing more. His claims that he was doing it for the greater cause of legalization are transparent and ridiculous. He has hurt the cause, not helped it, and anyone who hopes for marijuana to become a free trade substance should be outraged at the stigma he has caused.

A few quotes from the commentary on Canada.com seem to say it best:

“The issue is this country’s obligation to live up to the terms of the extradition treaties we have signed with the U.S. and other countries.

“We certainly wouldn’t like it if an American citizen used the Internet to lure a Canadian minor into the U.S. Canadians would be outraged if American authorities refused to hand over such a person and they would rightly point to the extradition law and say the U.S. was obligated.”

“Still, he continued to put himself in the spotlight, daring authorities to do something about his blatant disregard for both countries’ drug laws. Emery led rallies in Vancouver and urged others across the world to partake of his favorite weed.

“His misguided supporters consider him a martyr for the cause of marijuana decriminalization. He is nothing of the sort. Emery is a calculating businessman who flouted the law.

“His punishment should be a surprise to no one.”




#47 KanMan

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 11:12 AM

Western Standard


The Shotgun Blog

Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Marc Emery left his mark on Edmonton
conservatives. So where are they now?



Monday was an exceedingly sad day for advocates of freedom.

unless we end the War on Drugs, we're not going to be drug-free -- just un-free.

Posted by Matthew Johnston

Posted by Western Standard on September 30, 2009

Agreed on both points.

Thank you Western Standard!

Keith

#48 medpot

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 04:59 AM

The Martlet, B.C. Edu.

Letters to the Editor: letters@martlet.ca


Truly, we doth protest too much

The ubiquity of protests renders them ineffective


Sep 30, 2009 01:58 PM
Aaron Yeo


Posted Image


EDMONTON (CUP) — On Sept. 28, Marc Emery, the leader of the Marijuana Party of Canada, will be sentenced to five years in an American prison on a charge of conspiracy to manufacture marijuana.

Emery, known as the “Prince of Pot,” is a Canadian citizen but, after a joint DEA and RCMP raid in 2005, he faced extradition to the U.S. Thanks to the extreme efficiency with which North American court systems run, he will finally appear in a Seattle court next week.

In response, demonstrations were organized to take place all around the world Sept. 19 to protest his extradition.

One such rally was in Edmonton, where around 40 people marched from city hall to the Alberta legislature, demanding justice for Emery.

I was there.

It was a fun-filled afternoon of chanting, cheering and air punching, all for one person.

I met some great people, waved at honking cars, grabbed some cool photos and just had an overall awesome time, even before any natural enhancers were perhaps, kind of, maybe involved. It’s clear and obvious: protests are very social events.

However, one shouldn’t expect them to have any effect at all on Emery’s fate.

Demonstrations are becoming so common these days that their meaning and effectiveness is slowly wearing off. Every so often a friend of yours will hear about some march being planned and say, “Hey, there’s a rally next week. That’s pretty cool. Wanna go?”

“Yeah sure, I think it’ll be fun,” you might say.

Look back at February of 2003, for example. When millions of people around the world took to the streets to protest George W. Bush’s decision to invade Iraq. That day froze traffic, caused significant financial unrest, and put a halt to society on an otherwise normal day.

The media probably loved it, but did Bush give a shit? Was the invasion of Iraq affected in any way? You’ve got to wonder what Saddam was thinking when he watched those anti-war protests on his TV.

A demonstration is almost like some giant party, except without the alcohol and subsequent inebriated acts of embarrassing proportions. Attending one of these social gatherings is also an easy way to get on TV with little effort on your part, although a witty sign or an oversized papier-mâché head of a politician certainly helps.

One could say it’s like those iPhone commercials. Dissatisfied with Harper’s public education policies? There’s a protest for that.

Feel like you’re getting ripped off by the Canada Pension Plan? There’s a protest for that, too.

Want to marry your dog but the government won’t let you because that’s downright absurd and disgusting? There’s a protest for that. (Though please don’t forward the link to me.)

I’m not saying there’s anything wrong with someone wanting to rise up and stand in the centre of it all.

I admire people who can fight for a cause. But don’t expect peaceful protests to be the solution to all the world’s problems. Not to be a pessimist, but history tells us, unfortunately, that the most effective demonstrations usually end in bloody streets.




#49 medpot

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 08:04 AM

The Nanaimo Daily News

Letter


Jailing Marc Emery shows futility of U.S. drug war


The Daily News
Published: Thursday, October 01, 2009


Re: 'Prince of Pot' waits in jail for extradition' (Daily News, Sept. 29)

Canadian marijuana activist Marc Emery is now a political prisoner.

At a time when state and local governments are laying off police, firefighters and teachers, the U.S. government is prepared to spend a small fortune incarcerating Emery for five years.

The Canadian government should be ashamed of its role in this travesty. There is no justification for criminalizing citizens who prefer marijuana to martinis.

It's a fact: marijuana prohibition has failed. The U.S. has higher rates of marijuana use than the Netherlands, where marijuana is legally available.

Robert Sharpe

Arlington, Virginia




© The Daily News (Nanaimo) 2009


#50 papapuff

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Posted 01 October 2009 - 05:14 PM

Kelowna.com



Extradition of Marc Emery: Justice served or one more shot in a ridiculous war on marijuana? Join the debate


Thursday, October 1st, 2009 | 1:39 pm

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If you’ve never heard of Marc Emery, it’s not for lack of trying on his part. The self-proclaimed “Prince of Pot” has been dogging Canadian police and government officials for years now, as the head of the B.C. Marijuana Party, the publisher of Cannabis Culture magazine and the net broadcaster of PotTV.

Emery has had far more than his 15 minutes of fame as the subject of numerous newspaper articles, blog entries and TV news clips.

He’s been the subject of a 60 Minutes segment and the CBC has aired a documentary about him, sparked by his 2005 arrest at the request of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. His crime? Selling millions of marijuana seeds through his mail-order Internet business to would-be growers around the world, and more specifically, in the U.S.

Emery was most recently in the news for his extradition to the U.S. to face those charges. On Monday, Emery surrendered himself to sheriffs in the B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver.

I’ve known Emery since just before his big arrest (he’s been busted numerous times for pot possession). That’s when my partner and I, with an eye on filming a documentary, began interviewing Emery and the colourful cast of characters that make up the anti-cannibis prohibition movement in Vancouver.

It’s been a bit of a one-sided relationship, I guess, because I’m sure he only just started remembering my name, despite me having interviewed him dozens of times. That could be because of the throng of reporters and cameramen that have followed him throughout the years (he lives and dies by media coverage) or maybe because of his copious pot consumption. Wherever Marc is, there’s usually a bong and a cloud of smoke hovering nearby.

Not all the anti-cannabis prohibition activists will agree that the flamboyant Emery is the best thing for the movement. He’s loud, arrogant and relentless in his criticism of the Canadian government, indeed all governments, and the criminalization of marijuana. His motto? Overgrow the Government! His strategy over the years has amounted to the same tactic I used to get my mother to relax the rules when I was a teen; keep breaking them until they get tired of trying to enforce them.

Emery and his stoned cronies have worked out of a building at Hastings and Cambie for years, in an area that’s become known as the Pot Block, using it as the headquarters for the B.C. Marijuana Party. There’s no hiding what they’re doing there. The smell of marijuana hits you even before you walk in the door. Once inside, there’s every kind of bong, pipe and bubbler you could imagine for sale beside a vast display of pro-marijuana literature and racks and racks of hemp clothing. This is a full-on commercial operation and there’s nothing else to call it.

Emery’s in-your-face strategy has worked, at least in Canada. The Vancouver Police, tired of the optics showing burly police officers dragging doe-eyed neo-hippy chicks into paddy wagons on the six o’clock news, have largely retreated, leaving Emery and the B.C. Marijuana Party alone.

That all changed when the DEA came calling. The Mounties arrested Emery at their American counterpart’s request, over what they allege was essentially a drug-smuggling business. His seeds, the DEA say, were turned into billions of dollars worth of weed in various basements and attics all over America. Suddenly a crime that Canadian authorities have given up trying to enforce, is worth a lengthy jail sentence to their U.S. counterparts.

Now he’s facing five long years, subject to all the horrors of the U.S. penal system. The Prince of Pot could now become the Bitch of Bud.

After interviewing scores of pro-marijuana activists, I’ve heard just about every argument there is for the drug’s legalization. But the one that has always stood out for me, is the discrimination by the government against the users of cannabis versus the active encouragement for the use of two other legal drugs, tobacco and alcohol, both with a track record of harm far exceeding marijuana.

Don’t give me tired moral arguments against pot’s use. More crime and depravity is committed by drunks than stoners. Ask a cop who they would rather deal with. If he or she is being honest, they’ll confirm they have far more problems from drunks than potheads.

And forget the health argument. Tobacco kills thousands each year in Canada and can be purchased at your corner store. The government sells alcohol at its own chain of stores and it’s a proven killer in more ways than one. I’m not saying pot isn’t harmful, but show me the health benefits of whisky and cigarettes?

If the government isn’t willing to legalize marijuana, then flip it around. Make alcohol and tobacco illegal and watch our jails fill up faster than pint glass under a tap. Of course, that ain’t gonna happen and it shouldn’t. If mankind has shown one consistency through the ages, it’s that people like to get off centre, whether through drinking the juice of a fermented grape or smoking the leaves of a random plant, consequences be damned.

History has also shown us that prohibition of anything creates a black market for its demand and opportunities for organized crime to make a fortune. It happened during Prohibition and it’s happening now, with cannabis and the rampant gang problem in B.C.

The Prince of Pot may be an extreme example of the thousands of Canadians who use marijuana. Most are responsible people from all walks of life, who just want to unwind after work, like others might drink a glass of wine.

Legalize it, tax it, and quit giving criminal records to the thousands of otherwise law-abiding folk who just want to get off centre in a slightly different way.

john@kelowna.com

250-575-0521




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